Tuesday, 31 May 2016

the limes

We are hugely lucky to have a row of mature Lime Trees here at Cordwood.  Planted after WWII, the trees form a stately line separating the Orchard and Vegetable Garden from our Woodland Garden.

Ground being cleared beneath limes
Limes (or Linden Trees as they are sometimes known abroad) are not members of the citrus family. They are deciduous trees (Tillia x europaea) and bring real quality to the garden. Not only are they beautiful, their imminent flowers will exude a heady, honey-sweet scent that soaks the garden each year. And the nectar-rich flowers are a magnet to a host of insects including honey and bumble bees. The limes buzz and flutter night and day when they are in their floral glory.

Lime Hawk Moth
We have now reached the stage of our garden development project when we can give these lovely trees some respect. You see, as a short term measure I sited temporary compost bins, wood, containers, builders' bags - you name it - at their feet. Desecration I know.

But this weekend I've almost cleared the atrocious mess. In the future, the limes (in all their honey-scented glory) will be set within lawn.

And as if in thanks, the limes bestowed on me a most beautiful gift. I discovered an exquisite Lime Hawk moth (Mimas tiliae) as I was clearing: a creature more like a jewel than almost any other living thing I've seen. Perfectly camouflaged against a lime trunk we now learn that this members of this beautiful group of moths are bestowed with a second nose that enables them to evaluate whether a flower is worth a visit.

The Lime Hawk moth was a gift indeed.




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