Thursday, 29 September 2011

burning properties of wood

Clearing ground is all very well, but the aching and sweaty work of logging and processing the brash is time consuming. But hey ho, it needs to be done and the logs we are building up will warm us in years ahead. Pictures is Monday and Tuesday's work. On the right are oak logs and on the left cherry.

This is information I've collected from a number of sources about the burining properties of wood on the Cordwood site.


Burning properties of wood
The following species grow on site.

These are notes on their suitability as fuel for log burning stoves.

Species
Comments on burning
As fuel
Apple
Splendid. It burns slowly and steadily with little flame but good heat. The scent is also pleasing.

Y
Beech
A rival to ash – though not a close one, and only fair when green. Not as good as ash when dry. If it has a fault, it is likely to shoot embers a long way. Season for a year; excellent deadwood species.

Y
Birch
The heat is good but it burns quickly. The smell is pleasant.
Burn with slow burners such as wild cherry.

Y
Cedar

Needs to be fully dried. Full of snap and crackle. It gives little flame but much heat and the scent is beautiful.

Y
Cherry

Burns slowly with good heat. Another wood with the advantage of a pleasant scent.

Y
Horse Chestnut

Good flame and heating power but spits a lot.
Y
Larch         

Crackly, scented and fairly good for heat.
Y
Lime
Poor. Burns with a dull flame. Good coppice species; burn with fast burners such as birch.

N
Oak
It is sparse in flame and the smoke
is acrid. Very old dry seasoned oak is excellent for heat, burning slowly and steadily and producing little ash.
Season for a year; excellent for keeping fire lit overnight.

Y
Pine 
Burns with a splendid flame, but is apt to spit.

Y
Poplar

Poor to fair. High moisture content - season for a year
N
Spruce

Burns too quickly and with too many sparks
N
Sweet Chestnut
Needs to be properly seasoned similar to Oak
Spits a lot. The wood is not noted for burning well or giving off great heat.

Y
Sycamore

Burns with a good flame with moderate heat.
Y

Hardwoods have less resin and burn slower and longer. Softwoods burn quickly. In addition the seasoned length influences on the fuel efficiency.

Seasoning the wood refers to the allowed drying time before combustion.

Wood needs to be dried at least 4 to 6 months before use.

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